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Sachs Harbour NWT – 99 Years Ago Today

posted August 27, 2013

Thursday, August 27th 1914

“The ice had moved a few miles further on during the night, and the way was clear as far as the river before mentioned. We were now approaching the lower land, and I thought that on this point would be a good place to leave a cache of supplies.

We therefore placed the following articles in an iron drum and set them on the top of the bluff: flour, 200 lb, sugar, 50 lb, tea, 51 lb, a .30-30 carbine and 200 rounds of ammunition, a primus stove, cooking pots and matches. Five gallons of kerosene were also cached and on the top we placed a wooden cross….

We proceeded to the mouth of the river [Sachs River] and anchored. Since leaving the first river we passed, this is the only place where it would be practical to haul the schooner [Mary Sachs] on the beach, and hauled she must be this year if we want to use her again next summer.

I followed the cutbank for a mile or so towards Cape Kellet, which place could now be clearly seen. The ice is moving slowly to the west, and we should be able to advance a little further tomorrow.

There is a little wood lying about on the beach, and while I was away the others had gathered a dory load of it. They had seen three old camp sites and I went to have a look at them. They appear to be winter camps of hunting parties, for chopped wood is scattered about and a quantity of bones. The camps appear to be many years old, and the wood seems to have been cut with a sharper edged tool than a knife of copper. Several muskox skulls were seen and numerous deer antlers.” Diary of George Hubert Wilkins 1914

Charlie Thomsen, his daughter Annie, Natkusiak, and Peter Bernard caching supplies just east of Sachs Harbour, August 27, 1914

Charlie Thomsen, his daughter Annie, Natkusiak, and Peter Bernard caching supplies just east of Sachs Harbour, August 27, 1914